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10 Sep 2014 Vatican Comments (2)

Pope Francis greets paralyzed man who risked all to see him

Vatican City, Sep 10, 2014 / 04:53 am .- A man paralyzed from the neck down made his way to Pope Francis' general audience, saying he took the massively risky m…

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23 Dec 2015 News Vatican No comments

Pope Francis addresses Vatican Employees on family care issues

  Pope Francis welcomed the employees of the Vatican and the Vatican City State on Monday at the Paul VI hall, to exchange Christmas greetings with them…

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03 Dec 2014 Q&A Comments (7)

Is my friend's ability to see the past and future sinful?

Full Question A Catholic friend sometimes has psychic flashes of the past, the future, and of people's souls. This person did not seek this ability and has…

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05 Dec 2014 Q&A Comments (7)

Where is the scriptural justification that says I should honor Mary or treat her different from any other woman?

Full Question As an Evangelical, I believe in measuring things against the Bible. Where is the scriptural justification that says I should honor Mary or tr…

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03 Nov 2015 Articles Comments (1)

The 5 Papal Resignations in Catholic History

1. Benedict XVI: Joseph Ratzinger was elected Pope on 19th April 2005 as Pope Benedict XVI. He announced his resignation from the Papacy in 11 February 2013 sta…

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01 Sep 2016 Americas Europe News USA Vatican No comments

Pope Francis proposes new work of mercy: care for our common home

Holy Father makes proposal in message on World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation Pope Francis is proposing adding care for the environment to the traditio…

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04 Sep 2015 Europe News No comments

Retired bishop assaulted by passenger on a train in Ireland

Bishop Emeritus of Kerry said to be very shaken by the incident Bishop Emeritus Bill Murphy of Kerry was punched in the face last month by a drunken passenge…

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21 Oct 2016 News No comments

Bishop Cantu: Congo’s bishops working hard to steer nation to peace

Politicians in the country have agreed to move a planned election to April 2018 As the most respected institution in Congo, the Catholic bishops’ conference is…

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11 Feb 2016 Articles No comments

Art for Goodness’ Sake

The Virgin of Humility (1435-1445) by Fra Angelico (Bl. Giovanni da Fiesole). Located in the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain. How many famous artis…

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Canada’s House sends assisted suicide bill to Senate for approval

The bill, which is likely to be sent back for amendments, would legalise assisted suicide

The Canadian government’s assisted suicide legislation, which the nation’s bishops describe as “fundamentally unjust” and an “affront to human dignity,” easily passed third and final reading in the House of Commons on Tuesday and was sent to the Senate for final approval.

By a vote of 186-137, the House passed Bill C-14, which would legalise medically assisted death for mentally competent adults who, while not necessarily terminally ill, have a serious and incurable illness and are “suffering intolerably” and whose death is “reasonably foreseeable.”

The Catholic Register, a Canadian weekly, said the government rejected recommendations to extend assisted suicide to “mature minors” and to allow patients with degenerative diseases such as dementia to give advance consent. However, it said it would revisit those recommendations in coming months.

Under the new law, doctors and nurse practitioners would be permitted to actively cause, or assist in, the death of a consenting, qualified patient without risk of criminal charges.

Because of a 2015 Supreme Court ruling, a divided Senate had a June 6 deadline to give the bill royal assent. But asked if the deadline would be met, the Conservative leader of the Senate, Claude Carignan, told reporters, “no, no, impossible.”

A Senate committee has already signalled dissatisfaction with the bill and suggested it could be sent back to the House of Commons for amendments.

One objection of the committee is that although Bill C-14 provides conscience protection for doctors, it fails to extend that protection to religious health care institutions.

More than 40 Senators have requested time to speak on the bill, and many are expected to propose amendments.

Bishop Douglas Crosby of Hamilton, Ontario, president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, has said that failure to provide explicit protection for health care providers could “potentially force the closure of hospitals operated under religious auspices, most of which are Catholic.”

The bishops’ conference “absolutely” and “categorically” objects to the legalisation of euthanasia and assisted suicide.

“Bill C-14, no matter how it may be amended, is an affront to human dignity, an erosion of human solidarity and a danger to all vulnerable persons,” Bishop Crosby told a parliamentary committee.

Failure to enact a law by June 6 would see the Supreme Court ruling that overturned the ban on assisted suicide come into force without any federal legislation to regulate the practice.

Health Minister Jane Philipott expressed concern that, without legislation, “there are not sufficient safeguards in place.”

Lacking federal legislation, it would be left to provinces and medical regulators to govern the implementation of assisted suicide in their jurisdictions. That could create an uneven patchwork of regulations across the country, critics said.

Murray Rankin, justice critic for the New Democratic Party, predicted that, even if the bill becomes law, “it will be tied up in legal challenges for years to come.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau acknowledged that likelihood.

“We understand that this is the beginning of a conversation that will go on for the coming years as court cases, evidence, concerns and doctors evolve in their thinking as we approach this,” he told reporters.

“However, this is a big step. It needs to be taken right, and that is exactly what Bill C-14 does.”









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