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10 Sep 2014 Vatican Comments (2)

Pope Francis greets paralyzed man who risked all to see him

Vatican City, Sep 10, 2014 / 04:53 am .- A man paralyzed from the neck down made his way to Pope Francis' general audience, saying he took the massively risky m…

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23 Dec 2015 News Vatican No comments

Pope Francis addresses Vatican Employees on family care issues

  Pope Francis welcomed the employees of the Vatican and the Vatican City State on Monday at the Paul VI hall, to exchange Christmas greetings with them…

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03 Dec 2014 Q&A Comments (7)

Is my friend's ability to see the past and future sinful?

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05 Dec 2014 Q&A Comments (7)

Where is the scriptural justification that says I should honor Mary or treat her different from any other woman?

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03 Nov 2015 Articles Comments (1)

The 5 Papal Resignations in Catholic History

1. Benedict XVI: Joseph Ratzinger was elected Pope on 19th April 2005 as Pope Benedict XVI. He announced his resignation from the Papacy in 11 February 2013 sta…

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01 Sep 2016 Americas Europe News USA Vatican No comments

Pope Francis proposes new work of mercy: care for our common home

Holy Father makes proposal in message on World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation Pope Francis is proposing adding care for the environment to the traditio…

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04 Sep 2015 Europe News No comments

Retired bishop assaulted by passenger on a train in Ireland

Bishop Emeritus of Kerry said to be very shaken by the incident Bishop Emeritus Bill Murphy of Kerry was punched in the face last month by a drunken passenge…

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21 Oct 2016 News No comments

Bishop Cantu: Congo’s bishops working hard to steer nation to peace

Politicians in the country have agreed to move a planned election to April 2018 As the most respected institution in Congo, the Catholic bishops’ conference is…

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11 Feb 2016 Articles No comments

Art for Goodness’ Sake

The Virgin of Humility (1435-1445) by Fra Angelico (Bl. Giovanni da Fiesole). Located in the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain. How many famous artis…

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Over 100 bodies found in London – Investigation reveals shocking discovery

Bodies discovered in a pit near Liverpool underwent DNA testing, leading scientists to a massive discovery.

Crossrail reported a burial pit contained as many as 100 bodies.

Of those bodies, archaeologists removed 42 individuals, five of whom were exposed to Yersinia pestis, otherwise known as the bubonic plague.

The mass grave was dated between 1650 and 1670 with help from pottery, glass and coffin handles.

DNA testing revealed the Great Bubonic Plague of 1665, the last major bubonic plague epidemic in Britain that killed 100,000 Londoners, was truly caused by Yersinia pestis.

It has long been believed the bubonic plague was responsible for the deaths of the majority of London’s population but until this discovery, there was no solid evidence.

The cause of LondonThe cause of London’s great plague has been confirmed (Crossrail).

Jay Carver, the Crossrail Lead Archaeologist, stated: “The Crossrail project has given archaeologists a rare opportunity to study previously inaccessible areas of London. The discovery of the ancient DNA, which has eluded scientists for so long, is yet another piece of the jigsaw that we are piecing together to learn more about the lives and deaths of 16th to 18th Century Londoners.”

Don Walker, the Senior Osteologist at MOLA, reported: “This is a hugely significant discovery as it is the first identification of ancient DNA from the 1665 Great Plague in Britain. This discovery has the potential to greatly enhance scientist’s understanding of the disease and coupled with detailed research of the skeletons reveal more about this devastating epidemic and the lives of its victims.”

Finally, Vanessa Harding, a professor of London History, Birkbeck, and the University of London, said: “This is a very exciting finding, for the history of London, the history of disease, and the history of burial. It confirms that Yersinia pestis was present in early modern London plague epidemics, and links them epidemiologically with the 14th-Century Black Death and the 1720 Marseille plague.

“We still need, however, to understand why the disease manifested itself in so many different ways, and whether other pathogens made a significant contribution to these epidemics. The excavation also underlines the strength of custom and order in time of crisis, showing that plague burial, even in mass graves, could be controlled and orderly, with bodies in coffins laid neatly on each other – not quite the shamolic ‘plague pit’ of popular discourse.”

Though Yersinia pestis was once responsible for the deaths of thousands of people, today it is easily treated with a course of antibiotics.

By Kenya Sinclair









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