13 Oct 2015 Articles No comments

Why weren’t all priests able to absolve the sin of abortion already?

Q. I’m curious about the fact that to mark the Year of Mercy, Pope Francis will allow all priests to absolve the sin of abortion. Why isn’t that true already? I…

Read more

05 Sep 2015 News Vatican No comments

Fr. Ayuso: dialogue to defeat violence in name of religion

The Secretary of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, Fr. Miguel Ayuso, addressed members of the diplomatic corps present at a reception given fo…

Read more

18 Nov 2014 Q&A Comments (1)

Can homologous artificial insemination be permitted as a licit treatment for male infertility?

Full Question Can homologous artificial insemination be permitted as a licit treatment for male infertility? Answer Homologous artificial insemin…

Read more

10 Sep 2014 Articles Comments (9)

Does the Catholic Church Teach "Doctrines of Demons?"

Two days ago, we had a couple of converts to the Catholic Faith come by the office here at Catholic Answers to get a tour of our facility and to meet the apolog…

Read more

07 Dec 2015 Articles Comments (3)

The Miracle that inspired the popularly known 'Obi-Wan Kenobi' to become Catholic till death

Sir Alec Guinness a Hollywood actor who have featured in several movies including the 20th centuries movies like "Star wars" where he became more popular and kn…

Read more

10 Apr 2015 Q&A Comments (3)

Why can't the Poor (like my brother-in-law) have a funeral Mass, but the rich and powerful can?

  Full Question When my brother-in-law died, there was no priest available and so he couldn’t have a funeral Mass. A deacon said prayers at the funer…

Read more

16 Mar 2016 Middle East News No comments

UNICEF's Middle East director warns against an increasing number of child soldiers

According to a report published by UNICEF, March 15th marked the 5 year anniversary of the Syrian conflict. The Syrian five-year-old conflict has forced near…

Read more

19 Nov 2014 Q&A No comments

Is "Eucharistic Minister" the correct title for a layperson who distributes the Eucharist at Mass?

Full Question Is "Eucharistic Minister" the correct title for a layperson who assists in distributing the Eucharist at Mass? Answer No, the title…

Read more

08 Nov 2014 Q&A Comments (13)

If Jesus made an exception for divorce in cases of adultery, why doesn't the Church?

Full Question In Matthew 19:3-9 when the Pharisees are questioning Jesus about divorce, Jesus seems to make an exception in the case of adultery. Why, then…

Read more
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

Pope Francis to Faithful: Sin impoverishes and isolates us

  • Written by:
  • 1 Reply

The Pope spoke at the penitential celebration in St. Peter’s Basilica on Friday where he said, sin “impoverishes us and isolates us." The Apostle John writes: “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness" (1 Jn 1:8-9).

“It is a blindness of the spirit, which prevents us from seeing what is most important, from fixing our gaze on the love that gives us life. This blindness leads us little by little to dwell on what is superficial, until we are indifferent to others and to what is good," Pope Francis said.

Turning to priests, he said: “We need to re-examine those behaviors of ours which at times do not help others to draw close to Jesus.”

Below is the official text of Pope Francis’ speech at the Penitential Celebration:

Homily of His Holiness Pope Francis
Penitential Celebration
Saint Peter’s Basilica

Friday, 4 March 2016

“I want to see again" (Mk 10:51). This is what we ask of the Lord today. To see again, because our sins have made us lose sight of all that is good, and have robbed us of the beauty of our calling, leading us instead far away from our journey’s end.

This Gospel passage has great symbolic value for our lives, because we all find ourselves in the same situation as Bartimaeus. His blindness led him to poverty and to living on the outskirts of the city, dependent on others for everything he needed. Sin also has this effect: it impoverishes and isolates us. It is a blindness of the spirit, which prevents us from seeing what is most important, from fixing our gaze on the love that gives us life. This blindness leads us little by little to dwell on what is superficial, until we are indifferent to others and to what is good. How many temptations have the power to cloud the heart’s vision and to make it myopic! How easy and misguided it is to believe that life depends on what we have, on our successes and on the approval we receive; to believe that the economy is only for profit and consumption; that personal desires are more important than social responsibility! When we only look to ourselves, we become blind, lifeless and self-centred, devoid of joy and true freedom.

But Jesus is passing by; he is passing by, and he halts: the Gospel tells us that “he stopped" (v. 49). Our hearts race, because we realize that the Light is gazing upon us, that kindly Light which invites us to come out of our dark blindness. Jesus’ closeness to us makes us see that when we are far from him there is something important missing from our lives. His presence makes us feel in need of salvation, and this begins the healing of our heart. Then, when our desire to be healed becomes more courageous, it leads to prayer, to crying out fervently and persistently for help, as did Bartimaeus: “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!" (v. 47).

Unfortunately, like the “many" in the Gospel, there is always someone who does not want to stop, who does not want to be bothered by someone else crying out in pain, preferring instead to silence and rebuke the person in need who is only a nuisance (cf. v. 48). There is the temptation to move on as if it were nothing, but then we would remain far from the Lord and we would also keep others away from Jesus. May we realize that we are all begging for God’s love, and not allow ourselves to miss the Lord as he passes by. “Timeo transeuntem Dominum" (Saint Augustine). Let us voice our truest desire: “[Jesus], let me receive my sight!" (v. 51). This Jubilee of Mercy is the favourable time to welcome God’s presence, to experience his love and to return to him with all our heart. Like Bartimaeus, let us cast off our cloak and rise to our feet (cf. v. 50): that is, let us cast aside all that prevents us from racing towards him, unafraid of leaving behind those things which make us feel safe and to which we are attached. Let us not remain sedentary, but let us get up and find our spiritual worth again, our dignity as loved sons and daughters who stand before the Lord so that we can be seen by him, forgiven and recreated.

Today more than ever, we Pastors are especially called to hear the cry, perhaps hidden, of all those who wish to encounter the Lord. We need to re-examine those behaviours of ours which at times do not help others to draw close to Jesus; the schedules and programmes which do not meet the real needs of those who may approach the confessional; human regulations, if they are more important than the desire for forgiveness; our own inflexibility which may keep others away from God’s tenderness. We must certainly not water down the demands of the Gospel, but we cannot risk frustrating the desire of the sinner to be reconciled with the Father. For what the Father awaits more than anything is for his sons and daughters to return home (cf. Lk 15:20-32).

May our words be those of the disciples who, echoing Jesus, said to Bartimaeus: “Take heart; rise, he is calling you" (Mk 10:49). We have been sent to inspire courage, to support and to lead others to Jesus. Our ministry is one of accompaniment, so that the encounter with the Lord may be personal and intimate, and the heart may open itself to the Saviour in honesty and without fear. May we not forget: it is God alone who is at work in every person. In the Gospel it is he who stops and speaks to the blind man; it is he who orders the man to be brought to him, and who listens to him and heals him. We have been chosen to awaken the desire for conversion, to be instruments that facilitate this encounter, to stretch out our hand and to absolve, thus making his mercy visible and effective.

The conclusion of the Gospel story is significant: Bartimaeus “immediately received his sight and followed him on the way" (v. 52). When we draw near to Jesus, we too see once more the light which enables us to look to the future with confidence. We find anew the strength and the courage to set out on the way. “Those who believe, see" (Lumen Fidei, 1) and they go forth in hope, because they know that the Lord is present, that he is sustaining and guiding them. Let us follow him, as faithful disciples, so that we can lead all those we encounter to experience the joy of his merciful love.



1 comment

  1. Tracy Taylor Reply

    The truth indeed from the blessed Pope Francis.. There are many reasons for isolation. One may be exhausted by the ongoing hatred and revenge that is prevelent everyday and night from a world that, yes , has lost sight of the purpose of being or perhaps their search for the inner self, the true self of love and light has not been discovered or only partially discovered. A battle in more ways than can be imagined. Thank you Pope Francis for opening so many hearts with your way. It is no coincidence that it is you who in the position you are at this time in history. May God continue to strengthen you, guide you in your thoughts, words, and deeds to inspire change for the greater good of others, so we do not continue down the path of destruction, of Gods creation, of Gods intention for creation. (Happy, joyeous, free)So future generations may live….in love and light.♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡

Leave a Reply

  1. most read post
  2. Most Commented
  3. Choose Categories