Popes who were Africans

3. Pope Victor I

Pope_Victor_I

Pope Victor I (died 199) was a bishop of Rome, and hence a pope, in the late second century. The dates of his tenure are uncertain, but one source states he became pope in 189 and gives the year of his death as 199. He was the first bishop of Rome born in the Roman Province of Africa—probably in Leptis Magna (or Tripolitania). He was later considered a saint. His feast day is celebrated on 28 July as “St Victor I, Pope and Martyr”.

The primary sources vary over the dates assigned to Victor’s episcopate, but indicate it included the last decade of the second century. Eusebius puts his accession in the tenth year of Commodus (i.e. AD 189), which is accepted by Lipsius as the correct date. Jerome’s version of the Chronicle puts his accession in the reign of Pertinax, or the first year of Septimius Severus (i.e. 193), while the Armenian version puts it in the seventh year of Commodus (186). The Liber Pontificalis dates his accession to the consulate of Commodus and Glabrio (i.e. 186), while the Liberian Catalogue, a surviving copy of the source the Liber Pontificalis drew its information for its chronology, is damaged at this point Concerning the duration of his episcopate, Eusebius, in his History, does not state directly the duration of his episcopate, but the Armenian version of Eusebius’ Chronicle gives it as twelve years. The Liberian Catalogue gives his episcopate a length of nine years two months and ten days, while the Liber Pontificalis states it was ten years and the same number of months and days; the Felician Catalogue something over ten. Finally, Eusebius in his History (5.28) states Zephyrinus succeeded him “about the ninth year of Severus”, (201), while the Liber Pontificalis dates it to the consulate of Laternus and Rufinus (197). Lipsius, considering Victor in connection with his successors, concludes that he held office between nine and ten years, and therefore gives as his dates 189–198 or 199. (From Wikipedia, read more about this Pope here)


2. Pope Miltiades

Pope_miltiades

Pope Miltiades or Melchiades (Greek: Ο Άγιος Μιλτιάδης ; Μελχιάδης ὁ Ἀφρικανός; died 10 January 314), also called in Latin Pope Miltiades, was Bishop of Rome from 2 July 311 to his death in 314. According to the Liber Pontificalis, Miltiades was African. He was possibly a North African native from berber people. (From Wikipedia, read more about this Pope here)


 

1. Pope Gelasius I

San_Galasio_I

Pope Gelasius I (died 19 November 496) was Pope from 1 March 492 to his death in 496. He was probably the third and last Bishop of Rome of North African berber origin in the Catholic Church. Gelasius was a prolific writer whose style placed him on the cusp between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Gelasius had been closely employed by his predecessor Felix III, especially in drafting papal documents. His ministry was characterized by a call for strict orthodoxy, a more assertive push for papal authority, and increasing tension between the churches in the West and the East.

There is some dispute regarding where Gelasius was born: according to the Liber Pontificalis he was born in Africa (natione Afer), while in a letter addressed to the Roman Emperor Anastasius he called himself “born a Roman” (Romanus natus).That said, the latter assertion probably just means that he was born in Roman Africa before it was overrun by the Vandals.Most academics agree that Gelasius was a Berber born in what is now Kabylia, and successfully converted to Christianity around 492 AD all the Berbers of the Aures (who were the last to defend romanized north western-Africa with Kahina, the queen of the Romano-Berber kingdom of Aures, when the Arabs conquered the Maghreb).

(From Wikipedia, read more about this Pope here)













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