04 Sep 2014 Vatican Comments (2)

Analyst: Vatican regards Islamic State as waging a 'war of religion'

Vatican City, Sep 4, 2014 / 04:08 pm .- According to prominent Vatican analyst Sandro Magister, the Holy See views the aggression of the Islamic State as a reli…

Read more

02 Jun 2016 Americas Europe Middle East News USA Vatican Comments (2)

A Catholic in Ohio Sentenced to twelve Services in Baptist Church by Judge

An American Catholic who got into a fight with a street preacher has been sentenced to attend services at a Baptist church for 12 Sundays. Judge William Mall…

Read more

13 Dec 2014 Q&A No comments

If my friend's ex-husband refused to participate in the annulment process, does that mean she can't get one?

Full Question I am a sponsor for a candidate for confirmation with RCIA. My candidate has a former husband who is a Protestant and is refusing to go throug…

Read more

20 Nov 2015 Articles No comments

Governor forced to become bishop: the story of St Ambrose of Milan

St. Ambrose was Bishop of Milan, his hometown. He was born around A.D. 338 and died in 397. He was a very popular political figure, and since he was the Gove…

Read more

18 Apr 2016 Americas Europe News United Kingdom USA Vatican Comments (10)

Mark Wahlberg appreciates his Parish Priest for turning his Life and Career around

Mark Wahlberg a famous Hollywood award-winner actor and father of four kids has in an interview with Square Mile revealed that he would forever be grateful for …

Read more

01 Apr 2015 Q&A No comments

What's the correct understanding of "no salvation outside the Church"?

Full Question I am confused about a statement made by the ecumenical council of Florence in 1442. In its Decree for the Jacobites it stated "that no one, w…

Read more

04 Jul 2016 News USA Vatican Comments (2)

Prosecutors ask Vatican court to jail PR adviser for ‘inspiring’ leak of documents

Vatican prosecutors have requested that PR expert Francesca Chaouqui be given a tough jail sentence for “inspiring" the leaking of confidential documents. In…

Read more

09 Oct 2014 Articles Comments (379)

Mass Etiquette; Dos and Don'ts while at Mass

Fast: It doesn't even really feel like a fast anymore since its just an hour. The Church requires every communicant to begin preparing to receive Jesus by obse…

Read more

30 Sep 2015 News USA No comments

Pope asks young people to perform works of mercy in build up to World Youth Day

World Youth Day 2016 will take place next July in Krakow, Poland Pope Francis has asked the world’s young Catholics to perform spiritual and corporal works o…

Read more
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

Remains of US chaplain who died saving others at Pearl Harbor to be flown home

Fr Aloysius Schmitt, the first US chaplain to be killed in the Second World War, had a ship named in his honour

There was nothing yet infamous about December 7, 1941, when Fr Aloysius Schmitt woke up aboard the battleship the USS Oklahoma to celebrate Mass that Sunday morning at Pearl Harbor.

But just minutes after the liturgy ended, a surprise Japanese attack was underway, and Fr Schmitt would lose his life while helping save the lives of 12 others, becoming the first US chaplain to die during the Second World War.

Nearly 75 years after his death, the remains of Fr Schmitt, a native of St Lucas and graduate of Loras College, have been identified and are coming home to the Archdiocese of Dubuque.

Fr Schmitt’s remains were to be flown from Hawaii and will be flown to Iowa at the beginning of October. His flag-draped casket will arrive at his home parish, St Luke’s at St Lucas, for an evening memorial Mass on October 5.

His remains will then be transported to Christ the King Chapel at Loras College in Dubuque, where a vigil will be held on October 7.

A memorial Mass will be celebrated for Fr Schmitt there the next morning, with Dubuque Archbishop Michael Jackels as the main celebrant and homilist.

Military rites will take place outside the chapel immediately following the conclusion of Mass. Interment will take place inside Christ the King.

Fr Schmitt was “a son of Midwest soil and of the archdiocese," said Fr William Joensen, dean of spiritual life at Loras College.

Born in 1909, Fr Schmitt was the youngest of Henry and Mary Schmitt’s 10 children.

He grew up on the family farm near St Lucas, where he enjoyed outdoor activities like baseball, swimming, and ice skating, as well as spending time with his much beloved dog, Biff.

Fr Schmitt was an active member of St Luke Parish and attended the local Catholic school, where he arrived each morning after travelling four miles by horse.

As a young adult, Father Schmitt attended Loras College, then known as Columbia College, graduating in 1932.

He studied for the priesthood in Rome and was ordained on December 8, 1935. He served as a parish priest at both St Boniface in New Vienna and St Mary in Dubuque, as well as at a parish in the state of Wyoming.

Fer Schmitt requested, and received, permission from Archbishop Francis Beckman, then archbishop of Dubuque, to become a US Navy chaplain. In 1940, he was assigned to the USS Oklahoma.

Dr Steve Sloan never had the opportunity to meet his great-uncle Fr Schmitt, but he’s learned a lot about him thanks to older relatives who have shared stories and from veterans who also served on the Oklahoma.

“He was a gentle, soft-spoken man, but he had a great, witty sense of humour that drew people to him," Sloan said of Fr Schmitt. “By all accounts, he was very well respected by the sailors of his ship, both Catholic and non-Catholic alike."

On the fateful day of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Fr Schmitt’s ship was hit by four torpedoes and capsized, trapping him and much of the rest of the crew below deck.

Fr Schmitt and a number of other sailors who were in one of the ship’s flooding compartments managed to find a small porthole that provided a way out of the ship.

In the frantic moments that followed, survivors reported that Fr Schmitt scuppered his own chance of escape and instead helped 12 men through the porthole to safety.

He received the Navy and Marine Corps Medal and the Purple Heart for his brave actions that day. In 1943, the US Navy named a destroyer escort in his honour – the USS Schmitt.

The remains of the 429 sailors and Marines killed on the Oklahoma were found in the months and years following the attack; effects of decomposition allowed only a small number to be positively identified.

In 1944, the bodies of the unidentified were buried as “unknowns" in two Hawaiian cemeteries. They were exhumed three years later in an attempt to identify them using dental records. Those efforts proved unsuccessful, and they were reburied in 1950 in 61 caskets at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

In 2003, one of those caskets was dug up and five crew members were identified, thanks to modern DNA testing. Four years later, another casket was disinterred and an additional member of the Oklahoma’s crew identified.

In light of those findings, the US Department of Defence announced in 2015 that the remaining caskets would be exhumed and efforts made to identify the rest of the 388 unknowns of the Oklahoma’s crew and return them to their families.

The last of the caskets were dug up in November 2015. The painstaking process of identifying the remains has proven to be challenging but ultimately successful.

Military officials began releasing the names of newly identified crewmen this January and have continued to do so throughout 2016. They hope to complete the project by the end of this year.

Fr Schmitt’s relatives had been waiting anxiously to learn if his remains would be among those identified. Military officials first contacted the family three years ago when seeking a relative who could provide a DNA sample to aid in the identification of the chaplain’s remains.

Sloan told The Witness, Dubuque’s archdiocesan newspaper, the family received their first piece of good news this June when the military contacted them to say they had received a positive DNA match. It wasn’t confirmation they had identified the remains, but it was a hopeful sign.

“I got goose bumps," Sloan said of the day he received the call. “I remember where I was standing when they told me the news."

The family’s long-anticipated confirmation came the morning of September 5, when military representatives made the trip to Milford, Iowa, to knock on the door of Art and Dorothy Schultz.

As Fr Schmitt’s oldest living niece, Dorothy is considered the “primary next of kin," the individual with whom the military shares official notification of the positive identification of remains.

Sloan and his wife, Julie, were present for the notification in Milford. “It really hit home for me during that family visit," said Sloan, who helped contact other relatives with the good news. “I knew I was witnessing a historical moment. I thought to myself, ‘This is the final chapter in Fr Al’s journey. We’ll truly be bringing him home. We’ll finally be able to do something special for this incredible man.’"


Leave a Reply

  1. most read post
  2. Most Commented
  3. Choose Categories